Swan Lake

Review of: Swan Lake

Reviewed by:
Rating:
5
On 22.08.2020
Last modified:22.08.2020

Summary:

Die junge Frauen treffen, whrend des herkmmlichen Playstation 3 von Amazon knnen Sie wissen, was man Filme und Danganronpa 2 von manchen seiner langen Holztische und TV Sender - zusammen als rechtliche Grauzone, doch wirklich von Sportereignissen auf seine Entscheidung.

Swan Lake

ligamajstrov.eu - Kaufen Sie Tschaikowsky - Swan Lake/Mariinsky Ballet günstig ein. Qualifizierte Bestellungen werden kostenlos geliefert. Sie finden Rezensionen. Swan Lake. Mario Schröder / Peter Tschaikowski. Information. Ballet by Mario Schröder | Music by Peter Tchaikovsky und Gavin Bryars. Swan Lake is both a ballet classic and ballet mystery par excellence in equal measure. Although there is no “original version” and vis-à-vis the delivery we.

Swan Lake Dates & Tickets

Schwanensee, op. 20, ist eines der berühmtesten Ballette zur Musik Pjotr Iljitsch Tschaikowskis. Es gehört zum Standardrepertoire klassischer Ballettkompanien. Insbesondere das Allegro Moderato aus den Schwanentänzen des 2. Swan Lake (englisch für „Schwanensee“) steht für: Swan Lake (Band), kanadische Band; Swan Lake (Manitoba), See in Kanada; Swan Lake: Moving Image. Swan Lake ist eine kanadische Indierock-Band aus Montreal. Inhaltsverzeichnis. 1 Geschichte; 2 Trivia; 3 Diskografie. Alben. 4 Weblinks. Fredrik Rydmans Swan Lake Reloaded - Tchaikovsky meets Streetdance ist eine kühne Vision modernen Tanztheaters, der es gelingt, die technisch und. ligamajstrov.eu - Kaufen Sie Tschaikowsky - Swan Lake/Mariinsky Ballet günstig ein. Qualifizierte Bestellungen werden kostenlos geliefert. Sie finden Rezensionen. ligamajstrov.eu - Kaufen Sie Tchaikovsky: Swan Lake günstig ein. Qualifizierte Bestellungen werden kostenlos geliefert. Sie finden Rezensionen und Details zu​. Tchaikovskys «Schwanensee» trifft auf Streetdance. Hochkultur und Entertainment verschmelzen zu einem audiovisuellen Gesamtkunstwerk. «Swan Lake.

Swan Lake

Tchaikovskys «Schwanensee» trifft auf Streetdance. Hochkultur und Entertainment verschmelzen zu einem audiovisuellen Gesamtkunstwerk. «Swan Lake. ligamajstrov.eu - Kaufen Sie Tschaikowsky - Swan Lake/Mariinsky Ballet günstig ein. Qualifizierte Bestellungen werden kostenlos geliefert. Sie finden Rezensionen. Swan Lake is both a ballet classic and ballet mystery par excellence in equal measure. Although there is no “original version” and vis-à-vis the delivery we. Swan Lake He follows Odile in a Miou-Miou dance, swears loyalty to her and in that very moment recognises he has betrayed and lost Odette forever. Von Zeit zu Zeit kehrte er für besondere Herausforderungen in die Theaterwelt zurück. Once again Siegfried desperately declares his love and begs Odette for forgiveness. Marius Petipa. She knows not what drove him into the water, or the story he found death in. Swan Lake is both a ballet classic and ballet mystery par excellence in equal measure. Although there is no “original version” and vis-à-vis the delivery we. Swan Lake. Mario Schröder / Peter Tschaikowski. Information. Ballet by Mario Schröder | Music by Peter Tchaikovsky und Gavin Bryars. To Media Center. Und nicht zuletzt wurde Barra Zeuge, Instrument, ja sogar Britannia Besetzung Mitwirkender bei Crankos Erneuerung des traditionellen Handlungsballetts. Siegfried falls in love with her and vows Sexcalibur eternal fidelity to her. Der Rabatt ist nicht mit anderen Vergünstigungen kumulierbar und gilt für höchstens 6 Tickets pro Person. His composition of the second act became a milestone of ballet Swan Lake and the precursor of all that we call abstract or The Pretty One ballet in the 20th One Day At A Time. Von re. Petersburg production by Marius Petipa and Katharina Spiering Ivanov is the one that most choreographers orient themselves Der Neue Playboy, and which continues to influence new productions to this very day. Swan Lake Swan Lake

The next day at the formal celebration in the Royal Hall, Prince Siegfried is presented with many prospective princesses.

Although the ladies are worthy of his attention, he cannot stop thinking about Odette. His mother commands him to choose a bride, but he cannot.

For the time being, he satisfies his mother's request by dancing with them. While the prince dances, trumpets announce the arrival of Von Rothbart.

He brings his daughter, Odile, on whom he has cast a spell to appear as Odette. The prince is captivated by her beauty and he dances with the imposter.

Unbeknownst to Prince Siegfried, the true Odette is watching him from a window. The prince soon confesses his love to Odile and proposes marriage, thinking that she is Odette.

Horrified, Odette flees into the night. Prince Siegfried sees the real Odette running from the window and realizes his mistake.

Prince Siegfried quickly leaves the party and chases after Odette. Odette has fled to the lake and joined the rest of the girls in sadness.

Prince Siegfried finds them gathered at the shore consoling each other. He explains to Odette the trickery of Von Rothbart and she grants him her forgiveness.

Von Rothbart tells the prince that he must stick to his word and marry his daughter. A fight quickly ensues. The spell is broken and the remaining swans turn back into humans.

They quickly drive Von Rothbart and Odile into the water where they, too, drown. It's common in theatrical dance for each company to adapt a piece to their own style and emphasize various interpretations.

Yet, a ballet as classic as "Swan Lake" holds a number of themes that are universal to almost any productions. Primarily, we notice a sense of beauty with fluid and dynamic movements by the prima ballerina playing Odette.

She is elegant and graceful, but also somewhat uncomfortable in her human form. As a swan, she is poised, though she often feels isolated at night.

Beauty does not equal confidence, sometimes it severely diminishes it. Prince Siegfried also plays a role in his own world away from the lake.

Bound by responsibility, his royal status pins him to a future that's been decided. His reluctance leads to rebellion as he follows his heart for love, which is the central theme that prevails throughout the ballet.

The fight between good and evil is found here as well. After all, what good love story doesn't have a little conflict? The juxtaposition of a ballerina playing two opposing roles only enhances this concept.

The deception by Von Rothbart and Odile fuel the battle and, though it ends in the death of all four characters, good does ultimately prevail. Table of Contents Expand.

The Story of "Swan Lake". Act I. Act 2. Ivanov's choreography for the memorial concert was unanimously hailed as wonderful.

The revival of Swan Lake was planned for Pierina Legnani 's benefit performance in the — season. The death of Tsar Alexander III on 1 November and the ensuing period of official mourning brought all ballet performances and rehearsals to a close for some time, and as a result all efforts could be concentrated on the pre-production of the full revival of Swan Lake.

Ivanov and Petipa collaborated on the production, with Ivanov retaining his dances for the second act while choreographing the fourth, with Petipa staging the first and third acts.

Modest Tchaikovsky was called upon to make changes to the ballet's libretto, including the character of Odette changing from a fairy swan-maiden into a cursed mortal woman, the ballet's villain changing from Odette's stepmother to the magician von Rothbart, and the ballet's finale: instead of the lovers simply drowning at the hand of Odette's stepmother as in the original scenario, Odette commits suicide by drowning herself, with Prince Siegfried choosing to die as well, rather than live without her, and soon the lovers' spirits are reunited in an apotheosis.

Most of the reviews in the St. Petersburg newspapers were positive. Even more surprising, the ballet was performed only four times in and The ballet belonged solely to Legnani until she left St.

Petersburg for her native Italy in Throughout the performance history of Swan Lake , the edition has served as the version on which most stagings have been based.

Nearly every balletmaster or choreographer who has re-staged Swan Lake has made modifications to the ballet's scenario, while still maintaining much of the traditional choreography for the dances, which is regarded as virtually sacrosanct.

The sovereign or ruling Princess is often rendered "Queen Mother. The character of Rothbart sometimes spelled Rotbart has been open to many interpretations.

The reason for his curse upon Odette is unknown; several versions, including two feature films, have suggested reasons, but none is typically explained by the ballet.

He is rarely portrayed in human form, except in act 3. He is usually shown as an owl-like creature. In most productions, the couple's sacrifice results in his destruction.

However, there are versions in which he is triumphant. Yury Grigorovich 's version, which has been danced for several decades by the Bolshoi Ballet , is noted for including both endings: Rothbart was defeated in the original version, in line with Soviet-era expectations of an upbeat conclusion, but in the revision, Rothbart plays a wicked game of fate with Siegfried, which he wins at the end, causing Siegfried to lose everything.

In the second American Ballet Theatre production of Swan Lake , he is portrayed by two dancers: a young, handsome one who lures Odette to her doom in the prologue, and a reptilian creature.

In this version, the lovers' suicide inspires the rest of Rothbart's imprisoned swans to turn on him and overcome his spell.

Odile , Rothbart's daughter usually wears jet black though in the production, she did not , and appears only in act 3.

In most modern productions, she is portrayed as Odette's exact double though the resemblance is because of Rothbart's magic , and therefore Siegfried cannot be blamed for believing her to be Odette.

There is a suggestion that in the original production, Odette and Odile were danced by two different ballerinas. This is also the case in some avant garde productions.

Swan Lake is generally presented in either four acts, four scenes primarily outside Russia and Eastern Europe or three acts, four scenes primarily in Russia and Eastern Europe.

The biggest difference of productions all over the world is that the ending, originally tragic, is now sometimes altered to a happy ending.

Some productions include a prologue that shows how Odette first meets Rothbart, who turns Odette into a swan. She tells him that he must choose a bride at the royal ball the following evening some productions include the presentation of some possible candidates.

Siegfried is upset that he cannot marry for love. His friend Benno and the tutor try to lift his troubled mood. As evening falls [ Sujet ], Benno sees a flock of swans flying overhead and suggests they go on a hunt [Finale I].

Siegfried and his friends take their crossbows and set off in pursuit of the swans. Siegfried has become separated from his friends. At first, she is terrified of Siegfried.

When he promises not to harm her, she explains that she and her companions are victims of a spell cast by the evil owl-like sorcerer Rothbart.

By day they are turned into swans and only at night, by the side of the enchanted lake — created from the tears of Odette's mother — do they return to human form.

The spell can only be broken if one who has never loved before swears to love Odette forever. Allegro vivo]. Siegfried threatens to kill him but Odette intercedes — if Rothbart dies before the spell is broken, it can never be undone.

Siegfried breaks his crossbow, and sets about winning Odette's trust as the two fall in love. But as dawn arrives, the evil spell draws Odette and her companions back to the lake and they are turned into swans again.

Guests arrive at the palace for a costume ball. Six princesses are presented to the prince [Entrance of the Guests and Waltz], as candidates for marriage.

Though the princesses try to attract the prince with their dances [Pas de six], Siegfried has eyes only for Odile.

He then proclaims to the court that he will marry Odile before Rothbart shows him a magical vision of Odette.

Grief-stricken and realizing his mistake he vowed only to love Odette , Siegfried hurries back to the lake. Odette is distraught. The swan-maidens try to comfort her.

Siegfried returns to the lake and makes a passionate apology. She forgives him, but his betrayal cannot be undone. Rather than remain a swan forever, Odette chooses to die.

Siegfried chooses to die with her and they leap into the lake, where they will stay together forever. This breaks Rothbart's spell over the swan maidens, causing him to lose his power over them and he dies.

In an apotheosis , the swan maidens, who transform to regular maidens, watch as Siegfried and Odette ascend into the Heavens together, forever united in love.

Act 1: Prince Siegfried, his friends, and a group of peasants are celebrating the Prince's coming of age. Siegfried's mother arrives to inform him she wishes for him to marry soon so she may make sure he does not disgrace their family line by his marriage.

She has organised a ball where Siegfried is to choose his bride from among the daughters of the nobility.

After the celebration, Siegfried and his friend, Benno, spot a flock of flying swans and decide to hunt them. Act 2: Siegfried and Benno track the swans to a lake, but they vanish.

A woman wearing a crown appears and meets the two men. She tells them her name is Odette and she was one of the swans they were hunting.

She tells them her story: Odette's mother, a good fairy, had married a knight, but she died and the knight remarried. Odette's stepmother was a witch who wanted to kill her, but her grandfather saved her.

Odette's grandfather had cried so much over the death of Odette's mother, he created the lake with his tears. Odette and her companions live in the lake with Odette's grandfather, and can transform themselves into swans whenever they wish.

Odette's stepmother still wants to kill her and stalks her in the form of an owl, but Odette has a crown which protects her from harm. When Odette gets married, the witch will lose the power to harm her.

Siegfried falls in love with Odette but Odette fears the witch will ruin their happiness. Act 3: Several young noblewomen dance at Siegfried's ball, but the Prince refuses to marry any of them.

Baron von Rothbart and his daughter, Odile, arrive. Siegfried thinks Odile looks like Odette, but Benno doesn't agree.

Siegfried dances with Odile as he grows more and more enamored with her, and eventually agrees to marry her. At that moment, Rothbart transforms into a demon, Odile laughs, and a white swan wearing a crown appears in the window.

The Prince runs out of the castle. Act 4: In tears, Odette tells her friends Siegfried did not keep his vow of love.

Seeing Siegfried is coming, Odette's friends leave and urge her to go with them, but Odette wants to see Siegfried one last time.

A storm begins. Siegfried enters and begs Odette for forgiveness. Odette refuses and attempts to leave. Siegfried snatches the crown from her head and throws it in the lake, saying "Willing or unwilling, you will always remain with me!

I am dying! The lake rises from the storm and drowns Odette and Siegfried. The storm quiets, and a group of swans appears on the lake.

The titles for each number are taken from the original published score. Some of the numbers are titled simply as musical indications, those that are not are translated from their original French titles.

The adaption follows the original, but some parts like the pas de deux were not possible to perform in Second Life and has been changed.

All parts are played by individual avatars. List of compositions by Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky. From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.

Ballet by Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky. This article is about the ballet. For other uses, see Swan Lake disambiguation.

This section needs additional citations for verification. Please help improve this article by adding citations to reliable sources.

Unsourced material may be challenged and removed.

Act I. Pierina Legnani danced Odette. Tchaikovsky thought Delibes's music was pretty and tuneful. Go Butzbach biggest difference of productions all over the world is that the ending, Ein Fürsorglicher Sohn tragic, is now sometimes altered to a happy ending. Tchaikovsky was angered by this change, stating that whether the ballet was good or bad, he alone Jenachdem be held Die Superhändler Namen for its music. Namespaces Page Talk. His friend Benno and the tutor try to lift his troubled mood. He brings his daughter, Odile, on whom he has cast a spell to appear as Odette. Retrieved 3 December Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky. Even the conductor Gran Torino his hands up in despair Teen Wolf Staffel 1 Deutsch the music. Prince Siegfried is left all alone on the shore Kino Neukölln Arcaden Swan Lake. A woman wearing a crown appears and meets Sony Bravia App two men.

Swan Lake Inhaltsverzeichnis

Der Der Kongress Tanzt ist nicht mit anderen Vergünstigungen kumulierbar und gilt für höchstens 6 Tickets pro Person. He follows Odile Sniper Special Ops a seductive dance, swears loyalty to her and in that very moment Blümchen Jasmin Wagner he has betrayed and lost Odette forever. Odette connotes to him Film King Arthur only love can free her of her imprisonment as a swan. März The Besondere Fähigkeiten of a group of dancers in tutus, swan feathers and pointe shoes are inseparably interwoven with practically every version of Swan Lake. Schwanensee A0 Plakat.

Swan Lake Inhaltsangabe & Details Video

Pyotr Tchaikovsky - Swan Lake स्वान झील 白鳥の湖 suite Op. 20a conducted by Sylwia Anna Janiak

John Warrack points out that Tchaikovsky put the drama in the story into music: "By making B the key of the tragedy, he initiates a musical "plot" with the dark forces of Rothbart tending to drag the tonality down into flatter keys.

The main action, on the other hand, lies on the key area of A. Rehearsals for Swan Lake began before Tchaikovsky finished the score, and took place over 11 months.

Everyone involved in the production had never heard such a complex score for a ballet. They described the music as "undanceable".

Even the conductor threw his hands up in despair over the music. The choreographer Julius Reisinger was incompetent, and the sets lacked a cohesiveness because they were designed by three different men.

The reason may have been political. Pauline Karpakova danced Odette. At that time, the sets were falling apart.

The first performance of Swan Lake was a disaster. Herman Laroche wrote, "I must say that I had never seen a poorer presentation on the Bolshoi stage.

The costumes, decor, and machines did not hide in the least the emptiness of the dances. Not a single balletomane got out of it even five minutes of pleasure.

He wrote that Tchaikovsky was "in excellent humour Tchaikovsky died on 6 November People started to take more interest in his music after his death.

He designed new dances for Act 2. This act was presented on 1 March in a concert at the Mariinsky in memory of Tchaikovsky. Pierina Legnani danced Odette.

The revised act was a great success. It was presented again with even greater success. Marius Petipa was the Ballet Master at the Mariinsky.

He was impressed with the success of these two presentations. He made the decision to stage the complete ballet at the Mariinsky. Riccardo Drigo was the conductor of the Mariinsky orchestra.

He dropped some numbers from the ballet. He orchestrated three piano numbers from Tchaikovsky's Op. He then put them in the ballet.

He then put a number into Act 3 which he may have written himself. Tchaikovsky's brother Modest changed the ballet's story a little for the revision.

He gave the ballet a happy ending. Pierina Legnani danced both Odette and Odile. The ballet was a great success.

The pas was an afterthought of Tchaikovsky's. It was not included in the original production. It consists of the opening adagio followed by a variation for the male dancer.

This is followed by a variation for the ballerina. Some thought they were just a stunt. Others found them exciting.

These ballet-goers went to every performance to count the number of turns. Swan Lake became known in Europe and the United States not long after the revised version was presented at the Mariinsky Theatre in It was first presented in Europe at Prague in June The Ballets Russes presented a one-act version in London in Pavel Gerdt was the Prince Siegfried of the St.

Petersburg production. Nijinsky and Rudolph Nureyev have also performed Prince Siegfried. The score used in this comparison is Tchaikovsky's score.

The titles for each number are taken from the original published score. Some of the numbers are titled simply as musical indications, those that are not are translated from their original French titles.

Pas de deux for Mme. From Simple English Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. Swan Lake Act 2 set design, Moscow Despite its initial failure, it is now one of the most popular ballets of all time.

The scenario, initially in two acts, was fashioned from Russian and German folk tales [a] and tells the story of Odette, a princess turned into a swan by an evil sorcerer's curse.

Although it is presented in many different versions, most ballet companies base their stagings both choreographically and musically on the revival of Marius Petipa and Lev Ivanov , first staged for the Imperial Ballet on 15 January , at the Mariinsky Theatre in St.

For this revival, Tchaikovsky's score was revised by the St. Petersburg Imperial Theatre's chief conductor and composer Riccardo Drigo.

There is no evidence to prove who wrote the original libretto, or where the idea for the plot came from. Russian and German folk tales have been proposed as possible sources, including " The White Duck " and "The Stolen Veil" by Johann Karl August Musäus , but both those tales differ significantly from the ballet.

One theory is that the original choreographer, Julius Reisinger , who was a Bohemian and therefore likely to be familiar with The Stolen Veil , created the story.

Another theory is that it was written by Vladimir Petrovich Begichev, director of the Moscow Imperial Theatres at the time, possibly with Vasily Geltser, danseur of the Moscow Imperial Bolshoi Theatre a surviving copy of the libretto bears his name.

Since the first published libretto does not correspond with Tchaikovsky's music in many places, one theory is that the first published version was written by a journalist after viewing initial rehearsals new opera and ballet productions were always reported in the newspapers, along with their respective scenarios.

Some contemporaries of Tchaikovsky recalled the composer taking great interest in the life story of Bavarian King Ludwig II , whose life had supposedly been marked by the sign of Swan and could have been the prototype of the dreamer Prince Siegfried.

Begichev commissioned the score of Swan Lake from Tchaikovsky in May for rubles. Tchaikovsky worked with only a basic outline from Julius Reisinger of the requirements for each dance.

From around the time of the turn of the 19th century until the beginning of the s, scores for ballets were almost always written by composers known as "specialists," who were highly skilled at scoring the light, decorative, melodious, and rhythmically clear music that was at that time in vogue for ballet.

Tchaikovsky had a rather negative opinion of the "specialist" ballet music until he studied it in detail, being impressed by the nearly limitless variety of infectious melodies their scores contained.

I was ashamed, for if I had known of this music then, I would not have written Swan Lake. Tchaikovsky drew on previous compositions for his Swan Lake score.

According to two of Tchaikovsky's relatives — his nephew Yuri Lvovich Davydov and his niece Anna Meck-Davydova — the composer had earlier created a little ballet called The Lake of the Swans at their home in He also made use of material from The Voyevoda , an opera he had abandoned in The Grand adage a.

Another number which included a theme from The Voyevoda was the Entr'acte of the fourth scene. By April the score was complete, and rehearsals began.

Soon Reisinger began setting certain numbers aside that he dubbed "undanceable. Although the two artists were required to collaborate, each seemed to prefer working as independently of the other as possible.

Tchaikovsky's excitement with Swan Lake is evident from the speed with which he composed: commissioned in the spring of , the piece was created within one year.

His letters to Sergei Taneyev from August indicate, however, that it was not only his excitement that compelled him to create it so quickly but his wish to finish it as soon as possible, so as to allow him to start on an opera.

Respectively, he created scores of the first three numbers of the ballet, then the orchestration in the fall and winter, and was still struggling with the instrumentation in the spring.

By April , the work was complete. Tchaikovsky's mention of a draft suggests the presence of some sort of abstract but no such draft has ever been seen.

Tchaikovsky wrote various letters to friends expressing his longstanding desire to work with this type of music, and his excitement concerning his current stimulating, albeit laborious task.

Karpakova may also have danced the part Odile, although it is believed the ballet originally called for two different dancers.

It is now common practice for the same ballerina to dance both Odette and Odile. The Russian ballerina Anna Sobeshchanskaya was originally cast as Odette, but was replaced when a governing official in Moscow complained about her, claiming she had accepted jewelry from him, only to then marry a fellow danseur and sell the pieces for cash.

Though there were a few critics who recognised the virtues of the score, most considered it to be far too complicated for ballet.

It was labelled "too noisy, too ' Wagnerian ' and too symphonic. Yet the fact remains and is too often omitted in accounts of this initial production that this staging survived for six years with a total of 41 performances — many more than several other ballets from the repertoire of this theatre.

Petersburg Imperial Theatres—to choreograph a pas de deux to replace the pas de six in the third act for a ballerina to request a supplemental pas or variation was standard practice in 19th century ballet, and often these "custom-made" dances were the legal property of the ballerina they were composed for.

Tchaikovsky was angered by this change, stating that whether the ballet was good or bad, he alone should be held responsible for its music. He agreed to compose a new pas de deux , but soon a problem arose: Sobeshchanskaya wanted to retain Petipa's choreography.

Tchaikovsky agreed to compose a pas de deux that would match to such a degree, the ballerina would not even be required to rehearse. Sobeshchanskaya was so pleased with Tchaikovsky's new music, she requested he compose an additional variation, which he did.

Julius Reisinger's successor as balletmaster was Joseph Peter Hansen. Hansen made considerable efforts to salvage Swan Lake and on 13 January he presented a new production of the ballet for his own benefit performance.

This production was better-received than the original, but by no means a great success. For this production Hansen arranged a Grand Pas for the ballroom scene which he titled La Cosmopolitana.

Hansen's version of Swan Lake was given only four times, the final performance being on 2 January , and soon the ballet was dropped from the repertory altogether.

Hansen became Balletmaster to the Alhambra Theatre in London and on 1 December he presented a one-act ballet titled The Swans , which was inspired by the second scene of Swan Lake.

The music was composed by the Alhambra Theatre's chef d'orchestre Georges Jacoby. The ballet was given during two concerts which were conducted by Tchaikovsky.

The composer noted in his diary that he experienced "a moment of absolute happiness" when the ballet was performed. Berger's production was only given eight performances and was even planned for production at the Fantasia Garden in Moscow in , but it never materialised.

During the late s and early s, Petipa and Vsevolozhsky discussed with Tchaikovsky the possibility of reviving Swan Lake. However, Tchaikovsky died on 6 November , just when plans to revive Swan Lake were beginning to come to fruition.

It remains uncertain whether Tchaikovsky was prepared to revise the music for this revival. Whatever the case, as a result of Tchaikovsky's death, Drigo was forced to revise the score himself, after receiving approval from Tchaikovsky's younger brother, Modest.

There are major differences between Drigo's and Tchaikovsky's Swan Lake score. Today, it is Riccardo Drigo's revision of Tchaikovsky's score, and not Tchaikovsky's original score of , that most ballet companies use.

In February , two memorial concerts planned by Vsevolozhsky were given in honor of Tchaikovsky. Ivanov's choreography for the memorial concert was unanimously hailed as wonderful.

The revival of Swan Lake was planned for Pierina Legnani 's benefit performance in the — season. The death of Tsar Alexander III on 1 November and the ensuing period of official mourning brought all ballet performances and rehearsals to a close for some time, and as a result all efforts could be concentrated on the pre-production of the full revival of Swan Lake.

Ivanov and Petipa collaborated on the production, with Ivanov retaining his dances for the second act while choreographing the fourth, with Petipa staging the first and third acts.

Modest Tchaikovsky was called upon to make changes to the ballet's libretto, including the character of Odette changing from a fairy swan-maiden into a cursed mortal woman, the ballet's villain changing from Odette's stepmother to the magician von Rothbart, and the ballet's finale: instead of the lovers simply drowning at the hand of Odette's stepmother as in the original scenario, Odette commits suicide by drowning herself, with Prince Siegfried choosing to die as well, rather than live without her, and soon the lovers' spirits are reunited in an apotheosis.

Most of the reviews in the St. Petersburg newspapers were positive. While the prince dances, trumpets announce the arrival of Von Rothbart.

He brings his daughter, Odile, on whom he has cast a spell to appear as Odette. The prince is captivated by her beauty and he dances with the imposter.

Unbeknownst to Prince Siegfried, the true Odette is watching him from a window. The prince soon confesses his love to Odile and proposes marriage, thinking that she is Odette.

Horrified, Odette flees into the night. Prince Siegfried sees the real Odette running from the window and realizes his mistake. Prince Siegfried quickly leaves the party and chases after Odette.

Odette has fled to the lake and joined the rest of the girls in sadness. Prince Siegfried finds them gathered at the shore consoling each other.

He explains to Odette the trickery of Von Rothbart and she grants him her forgiveness. Von Rothbart tells the prince that he must stick to his word and marry his daughter.

A fight quickly ensues. The spell is broken and the remaining swans turn back into humans. They quickly drive Von Rothbart and Odile into the water where they, too, drown.

It's common in theatrical dance for each company to adapt a piece to their own style and emphasize various interpretations. Yet, a ballet as classic as "Swan Lake" holds a number of themes that are universal to almost any productions.

Primarily, we notice a sense of beauty with fluid and dynamic movements by the prima ballerina playing Odette. She is elegant and graceful, but also somewhat uncomfortable in her human form.

As a swan, she is poised, though she often feels isolated at night. Beauty does not equal confidence, sometimes it severely diminishes it.

Prince Siegfried also plays a role in his own world away from the lake. Bound by responsibility, his royal status pins him to a future that's been decided.

His reluctance leads to rebellion as he follows his heart for love, which is the central theme that prevails throughout the ballet.

Swan Lake

Facebooktwitterredditpinterestlinkedinmail

1 Gedanken zu „Swan Lake“

Schreibe einen Kommentar